Reflections and case studies in crisis management

While every organisation hopes that they will not be confronted with a crisis, the reality is that a crisis could happen to anyone.

On the 14th March, IABC and Regester Larkin are hosting an evening seminar reflecting on recent corporate crises and the lessons that can be learnt from them. Delegates will also have the opportunity to share their own experiences of crisis communication.

The seminar will be led by Regester Larkin’s chief executive Andrew Griffin. His insights will be drawn from crises including the crashes of Malaysia Airlines’ flights MH370 and MH17, Volkswagen’s emission scandal and TalkTalk’s cyber attack.

Join us to learn more about what makes an effective crisis response.

There are just 30 places available and these will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Should the event become fully subscribed we will put a wait list in place.

Agenda:

  • 5:45pm arrive
  • 6:00pm welcome from Casilda Malagon, President, IABC UK
  • 6:15pm presentation from Andrew Griffin, CEO, Regester Larkin
  • 6:45pm Q&A and group discussion
  • 7:15pm round up
  • 7:30pm finish and drinks

 

Book at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/reflections-and-case-studies-in-crisis-management-tickets-20888733765

 

Cancellation policy: 100% refund if your place is cancelled on or before the 6th March 2016. If you cancel your place between 7th-10th March we will refund 50% of your ticket cost. If you cancel on or after the 11th March, there will be no refund. You are welcome to send an appropriate replacement in your place.


EVENT INFORMATION

 

Date: Monday 14th March

 

Venue: Regester Larkin, 6th Floor, 16 St Martin’s le Grand, St Paul’s, London, EC1A 4EN

 

Agenda:

  • 5:45pm arrive
  • 6:00pm welcome from Casilda Malagon, President, IABC UK
  • 6:15pm presentation by Andrew Griffin, CEO, Regester Larkin
  • 6:45pm Q&A and group discussion
  • 7:15pm round up
  • 7:30pm finish and drinks

Could HR + PR = parity in pay?

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Does the PR industry lack HR skills and is this contributing to the gender pay gap?

Earlier this year the Chartered Institute of Public Relations published the results of its State of the Profession Survey.

It established that one of the top issues the industry faces is the gender pay gap.

A salary discrepancy of £8,483 in favour of men cannot be explained by any other factor such as length of service, seniority, parenthood, or a higher prevalence of part-time work among women.

It’s a sobering thought when over two-thirds of practitioners in the profession are female. The CIPR has committed to tackling the issue head on through a four point plan, which sets out what the Institute intends to do to help employers narrow the pay gap going forwards.

It can’t happen quickly enough.

Not a women’s issue but an issue of how well you run your business

This Autumn the CIPR will publish the results of research that’s being undertaken on people and performance management within the PR industry.
The survey of PR employers looks at which general practices are in place within member organisations to define pay at a senior and junior level and who is responsible for this.

From work carried out to date, such as round table events with a variety of industry practitioners including freelancers, SME owner-managers, in house practitioners, agency players, academics and recruitment specialists, there is a clear indication of a potential skills gap in terms of the human resources function.

While it’s true this wouldn’t universally apply, for example where public sector and larger organisations are concerned, the CIPR wants to know more broadly if this is actually the case.

Read more